Category Archives: Popular Culture

Trivia Questions: Do You Know Me?


QUESTION: Do you know me? I was First Lady of the United States and had a front row seat for the birth of the modern Democratic Party. In this photo from the National Wax Museum, I am shown with Presidents Martin Van Buren and John Quincy Adams. The White House collection has many priceless paintings but art historians say the most valuable portrait of all is of me! Continue reading

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TRIVIA QUESTION: How Did Howard Hughes Stop The Great Publishing Hoax of 1972?


ANSWER: After a 1946 plane crash in Beverly Hills, Howard Hughes went into seclusion. He recovered from his injuries but had a long term addiction to pain killers. For the next three decades he was well known for his refusal to meet with anyone.
The top executives of his major companies (Hughes Aircraft, RKO, TWA and the Hughes Medical Center) never met him. Hughes owned seven casinos in Las Vegas and had over 8000 employees in the state, but despite repeated demands, he refused to meet with the Nevada Gaming Commission. He finally left Nevada after five years to avoid them. Continue reading

Tattoos and Evening Gowns by Gregory Hilton


Last night’s Washington Ballet was jammed with spectacular women and the people watching was excellent. They always has the best parties. A young woman at my table essentially called me grandpa, but I deserve it. I am 30 years her senior and act 50 years older. Continue reading

Trivia Question: Do You Know Me?


I was considered a great beauty in my youth and I married a Yale educated attorney. We had 10 children and over 50 servants (you would call them slaves). Our large estate is now part of a well known university with over 20,000 students. Continue reading

Trivia Questions: Answer – Floride Calhoun


ANSWER: My husband, John C. Calhoun, was Vice President of the United States under both John Quincy Adams and Andrew Jackson. He is one of only two vice presidents to have that distinction. (The other was George Clinton who served under both Jefferson and Madison). Continue reading

How Has The United States Senate Changed Since the 19th Century by Gregory Hilton

Henry Clay is depicted speaking to the Senate about the Compromise of 1850. This lithograph shows: 1. Henry Clay (W-KY), 2. Daniel Webster (W-MA), 3. Thomas Hart Benton (D-MO), 4. Lewis Cass (D-MI), 5. William Seward (W-NY), 6. Vice President Millard Fillmore (W-NY), 7. William Dayton (W-NJ), 8. William M. Gwin (D-CA), 9. John C. Calhoun (D-SC), 10. James A. Pearce (W-MD), 11. Robert F. Stockton (D-NJ), 12. Henry S. Foote (D-MS), 13. Stephen A. Douglas (D-IL), 14. Pierre Soule (D-LA), 15. Truman Smith (W-CT), 16. Salmon P. Chase (F-OH), 17. William R. King (D-AL), 18. John Bell (W-TN), 19. James Mason (D-VA), 20. James Cooper (W-PA), 21. Willie Mangum (W-NC), 22. Sam Houston (D-TX). W = Whig, F= Free Soil.

Since 1789 there have been 1,910 Americans who have served as United States Senators. The average length of service is 12.82 years, which is about two terms. In the 19th century many Senators were unable to serve a full six year term, and only a small number of lawmakers were re-elected. Continue reading

Why is Hollywood Ignoring the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan? by Gregory Hilton


The Academy Awards were held earlier tonight, and another year has passed without a single great major movie about America’s role in Iraq and Afghanistan. “The Hurt Locker” did win awards but it was panned by numerous veterans and did little to increase respect for the military. Continue reading