Category Archives: Health Policy

How Has The United States Senate Changed Since the 19th Century by Gregory Hilton

Henry Clay is depicted speaking to the Senate about the Compromise of 1850. This lithograph shows: 1. Henry Clay (W-KY), 2. Daniel Webster (W-MA), 3. Thomas Hart Benton (D-MO), 4. Lewis Cass (D-MI), 5. William Seward (W-NY), 6. Vice President Millard Fillmore (W-NY), 7. William Dayton (W-NJ), 8. William M. Gwin (D-CA), 9. John C. Calhoun (D-SC), 10. James A. Pearce (W-MD), 11. Robert F. Stockton (D-NJ), 12. Henry S. Foote (D-MS), 13. Stephen A. Douglas (D-IL), 14. Pierre Soule (D-LA), 15. Truman Smith (W-CT), 16. Salmon P. Chase (F-OH), 17. William R. King (D-AL), 18. John Bell (W-TN), 19. James Mason (D-VA), 20. James Cooper (W-PA), 21. Willie Mangum (W-NC), 22. Sam Houston (D-TX). W = Whig, F= Free Soil.

Since 1789 there have been 1,910 Americans who have served as United States Senators. The average length of service is 12.82 years, which is about two terms. In the 19th century many Senators were unable to serve a full six year term, and only a small number of lawmakers were re-elected. Continue reading

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40% of U.S. Parents: Stop The Nonsense, Get Your Child Immunized by Gregory Hilton

The most visible opponent of childhood immunization is celebrity Jenny McCarthy. She has written two books on the subject and told Oprah Winfrey vaccines are not safe. The response from the American Academy of Pediatrics was: "There's no valid scientific evidence that vaccines cause autism, but because of unfounded fears, the U.S. is suffering its biggest measles outbreak in a decade."


The relationship between autism and vaccines has been a major issue for the past 12 years. Actress Jenny McCarthy and politicians such as Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) have tragically convinced thousands of parents not get their children vaccinated. The link is completely untrue, and many of the leading people who perpetuated this myth were cruel profit seekers. The parents of over 5,000 autistic kids are now requesting compensation for vaccine injury. Of more importance, childhood diseases almost unknown in the U.S. have come back and children have needlessly died. Continue reading

Ron Paul and the The Dangers of the Anti-Vaccine Movement by Gregory Hilton

Ron Paul and his anti-vaccine supporters are wrong. Vaccinations save millions of lives every year. People no longer die of cholera, smallpox, scarlet fever, and dozens of other diseases which were once endemic to the United States. Your child should be immunized. A very small number of people have had adverse reactions, but there is no reason to stop these programs. Continue reading

The Outlook for ObamaCare by Gregory Hilton

Rep. Fred Upton (R-MI), the new Chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, today said ObamaCare will be repealed by the House before the State of the Union Address. Upton said the real surprise will be the number of Democrats voting for repeal. Upton is predicting a two-thirds veto-proof majority. A veto proof (67 votes) majority does not exist in the Senate. Continue reading

The Final Days of Speaker Pelosi and the Obamacrats of Capitol Hill by Gregory Hilton

With one month to go before the election, prospects for Republican control of the House of Representatives are excellent. Media attention is focused on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and her ouster will result in many additional benefits for the conservative movement. When the GOP gains control a top target for the new Speaker will be the Congressional Budget Office (CBO). Continue reading

Senator Blanche Lincoln (D-AR) Was Defeated The Day Obama Was Elected by Gregory Hilton

Senator Blanche Lincoln (D-AR) has been running behind in her re-election campaign all year. No one expects her to be re-elected, but in a poll out today she is losing by an astronomical 65% to 27% margin. Lincoln has not committed any crime and she is not among the top Senate liberals. She has not made any serious errors, but organized labor and liberal activist groups spent over $10 million on a primary campaign to defeat her.
The message from Arkansas is that Blanche Lincoln was defeated on the day Barack Obama was elected. The President is radioactive in Arkansas and his approval rating is now at a dismal 31%. The GOP now has one Congressional seat but they are expected to capture 75% of the House delegation in November. Sen. Mark Pryor (D-AR) is more liberal than Lincoln and he is very pleased that he does not have to face the electorate until 2014.
Lincoln inflicted a major wound on herself the day she became the deciding vote on ObamaCare. If she voted no, it meant risking defeat in a primary, but by voting yes she sealed her doom in the general election. Prior to the health care vote she was considered a competent centrist. Once she voted for ObamaCare the tide turned swiftly and devastatingly against her.

Obama’s Broken Promises: The Message From Iowa by Gregory Hilton

President Barack Obama is expected to sign the health care reform legislation tomorrow and he will return to Iowa City on Thursday. It will be his first trip outside of the nation’s capital since the House of Representatives narrowly passed the bill on Sunday evening.
The President will discuss health care at the University of Iowa and in the city where he first unveiled his medical plans three years ago. Iowa City was then a bastion of Obama support but that has changed dramatically. The President’s approval has slipped steadily in Iowa since he carried the state in 2008 and after winning its leadoff Democratic nominating caucuses that year. According to the Des Moines Register’s Iowa Poll, only 33% approve of his health care plans while 58% disapprove.
A study released Monday indicates the bill is highly unpopular with the very professionals which will be asked to treat an expanded pool of insured Americans. Seventy-one percent of U.S. physicians said they had an unfavorable opinion of the administration’s plan. The poll of 1,217 physicians was conducted by HCD Research and the Muhlenberg College Institute of Public Opinion. Of those who had a negative view of the President’s plan, 80% said the new law would have made them less likely to enter the medical field.
A major reason why American’s have soured on the President can be seen in Iowa. The significant theme in the 2008 Obama campaign was to bring the nation together, and to govern in “a post partisan manner.” That has never happened, and not one Republican in the House or Senate voted for the health care bill. All of the GOP reform proposals were rejected, and it is now clear Obama is one of our most partisan presidents.
Obama has constantly been in the national spotlight since he won the Iowa precinct caucuses on January 3, 2008. His address that evening in Des Moines emphasizes his subsequent failure to cross party lines and to move forward in a bipartisan manner. In claiming his Iowa victory, Obama said:

You said the time has come to move beyond the bitterness and pettiness and anger that’s consumed Washington; to end the political strategy that’s been all about division and instead make it about addition – to build a coalition for change that stretches through Red States and Blue States. . . We are choosing hope over fear. We’re choosing unity over division, and sending a powerful message that change is coming to America.
I’ll be a President who finally makes health care affordable and available to every single American the same way I expanded health care in Illinois – by bringing Democrats and Republicans together to get the job done.
This was the moment when we finally beat back the politics of fear, and doubt, and cynicism; the politics where we tear each other down instead of lifting this country up. . . . We are not a collection of Red States and Blue States, we are the United States of America; and at this moment, in this election, we are ready to believe again.

Barack Obama entered the White House with an enormous reservoir of political and public support. His honeymoon with the American public was greater than any incoming president in the past three decades. He had better numbers, and they were usually by double digits, than Bill Clinton, Ronald Reagan or either George Bush on every item traditionally measured in transition polls.
President-elect Obama told CBS’s Steve Croft about his ability to bridge differences and bring people together. He said he wanted to rally Americans to a common cause. To date, the only groups Obama united are the Republican Party and his political opponents. The President is now returning to Iowa but the message of his 2008 campaign has been forgotten.